Lexington Regional Health Center is proud to offer aquatic physical therapy in our state-of-the-art aquatic therapy pool.

Aquatic therapy is the evidence-based and skilled practice of physical therapy in an aquatic environment.  It includes but is not limited to treatment, rehabilitation, prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment with or without the use of assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective, or supportive devices and equipment.

Advantages of Aquatic Therapy

Buoyancy: Decreases the effects of gravity. Increases functional abilities. Less fear of falling for patients.

Hydrostatic Pressure: Aids in reducing edema. Helps build up muscles of inspiration and assists with exhalation.

Viscosity: Provides resistance to movement. Allows increased time of response for patients’ equilibrium reactions (allows the patient to recover when he/she loses their balance).

Turbulence: Can be used to treat balance and stabilization problems. Can be used to increase resistance during strengthening and endurance exercises. Can be used to increase proprioceptive feedback.

Lexington Regional's Aquatic Therapy Pool16 Aquatic Therapy Pool

Our facility is a Hydroworx 1100 series pool with stair access for ambulatory patients. A chair lift is available for patients who cannot maneuver stairs.

Other features of our pool include:

  • Underwater treadmill
  • Deep water well - for suspended exercises
  • Powerful jets to provide resistance
  • Warm water- average temperature is 92°F.
  • Massage capabilities
  • Computerized system to accurately record treatment sessions

Aquatic Therapy Works!

“I was very pleasantly surprised by the many features of the new pool. Water therapy was so beneficial - movement is easier and more comfortable. ... so many exercises are possible in the pool.”
     - Judy Howard

“I think this water therapy has helped me more than anything, especially for my shoulder.”
    - Colleen Rader

“I noticed after the first two aquatic sessions, I got up one morning and didn’t hurt for the first time in twenty years.”
    - Jim O’Donnell